(137) Does set point mean I will always be fat? (with Stefani Reinold)

What does your body want to weigh? Have you heard of set point theory and wonder what it means for you and your body? Will it always look the way it does now? Or will it get smaller or larger? Listen to this latest episode of Love Food with special guest Stefani Reinold MD from the It’s Not About the Food Podcast.

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This episode is brought to you by my courses: PCOS and Food Peace and Dietitians PCOS and Food Peace. You CAN make peace with food even with PCOS and I want to show you how.

This episode’s Dear Food letter:

Dear Food,
I began my intuitive eating journey recently with a non diet dietician who specializes in treating ED and PCOS. According to her you are not the enemy and once I get my PCOS under control and reject diet culture my body will return to my setpoint. I am oversimplifying but you get the point.
My problem is that for as long as I can remember I have always been fat so I don’t know that I trust that knowledge. Could it be that there are people whose set points are in the “morbidly obese” range?
Well I guess I was a normal weight once until about age 5. At 5 I was the tallest girl in class. Taller than all the boys even and yes heavier. I wasn’t overweight just much taller than all the rest but adults would comment when they went to pick me up I was too heavy. I was too tall at my 8th birthday for the ball pit my parents had paid so much to reserve for my birthday. I was so “big”. They meant tall but I thought they meant fat.
I started gaining weight because my main abuser didn’t like fat girls and found them unattractive. Back then you were my friend because you protected me from him and most men and cat calls. Now I see I built my own prison and am left wondering if some people don’t have a healthy set point?
Sincerely,
Confused in Cleveland

Show Notes:

Do you have a complicated relationship with food? I want to help! Send your Dear Food letter to LoveFoodPodcast@gmail.com. 

Click here to leave me a review in iTunes and subscribe. This type of kindness helps the show continue!

(135) Bingeing was my biggest fear, now its my constant reality (with Nicole Cruz)

Has your relationship with food been through the ringer? Listen as this letter writer describes her initial restricted relationship with food yet now bingeing is a daily part of her life. Have you experienced this too? While there is shame in this for many it is a predictable and vital part of nutritional rehabilitation on your Food Peace journey. It doesn’t mean you are weak it means you are a successful human staying alive. Listen now for more and learn from guest Nicole Cruz.

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This episode is brought to you by my courses: PCOS and Food Peace and Dietitians PCOS and Food Peace. You CAN make peace with food even with PCOS and I want to show you how.

This episode’s Dear Food letter:

Dear Food,

The high school version of me would have been the last person on this Earth to ever believe that my relationship with you would end up causing me so much heartache and pain.

I was fine until college. Backtracking to childhood, I always loved you. I was a foodie, never overthought and wasn’t obsessed with the idea of what I would eat next. Food was wonderful, especially “treats” or “junk-food” type items that I didn’t get to eat often. I know there were times when my eyes were bigger than my stomach, but maybe this is a thing that many young kids also experience?

High school was normal. I was active playing a sport that I loved, busy with school, and spending time with family and friends. Senior year, I found myself with more freedom than ever. A lot of it was spent watching tv or cooking and eating with friends.

Then came college. After a particularly sad and confusing breakup with a boy and betrayal by a friend, my college friend group disintegrated. In retrospect, I think I may have retreated into TV and snacks, and there was no one to tell me to do differently. Then, during Thanksgiving break, I realized that I had been too free with you, food, and my “cute little body” was quickly becoming something I was ashamed of and disgusted by.

I’d never had anything but a small body and lived in a family of small people. I decided I would pay more attention to what and how much I was eating. I figured this would help get myself under control. And from the moment I became aware of your presence and your power in my life, things really have never been the same since.

Fast forward through five months of increasingly difficult and dreadful exercise regimens and an increasingly restricted intake of food, I left school early to move home and enter outpatient treatment.

My junior year, I finally transferred into XYZ College. I was ecstatic, but the restriction started almost right away. This time, though, my body was far more resistant to restriction, and it was increasingly difficult to not give in and binge. I returned home after only 3 months, and didn’t return to school until the next summer.

Now, my 4th year of college is almost over. That means I’ve been binging for a year now. It’s hard to believe that I ever was able to restrict at all, because binging is such an everyday part of my life now. Over these past years, I have had consistent therapy, and have also met with dietitians, but it seems like nothing is able to help me. In fact, the binging seems like it’s getting worse and worse – in the past two months alone, I have gained X pounds.

I think I’ve lost hope in ever being normal with food or body image. I feel so abnormal and wrong. In recovery, binging was always my biggest fear, and now it’s my constant reality. I have all the tools and resources I should need to help myself and change, but I’m still doing this.

How did we get this far?!

Love,

Secretly Broken

Show Notes:

Do you have a complicated relationship with food? I want to help! Send your Dear Food letter to LoveFoodPodcast@gmail.com. 

Click here to leave me a review in iTunes and subscribe. This type of kindness helps the show continue!

(10) Kimmie Singh on worthiness and chronic conditions

This Chapter of the PCOS and Food Peace Podcast is brought to you by Julie’s PCOS and Food Peace course. Get 25% off using the coupon code ‘podcast’ at check out. Get all the details here:

Did you enjoy the podcast? Leave us a rating, review, subscribe or share the podcast! Doing these small acts of kindness help the show grow and connect more with the concept of Food Peace.

Notes:

Thank you to Theralogix, the makers of Ovasitol, for sponsoring the podcast.

  • Ovasitol is an inositol supplement with a blend of myo-inositol and D-chiro-inositol, in the body’s optimal ratio of 40 to 1.
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  • In convenient powder form, Ovasitol can be enjoyed in your favorite beverage or smoothie.
  • Available in both a canister and convenient single-serving packets, Ovasitol contains 100% pure inositols, with no additives.
  • Read our blog post about what Inositols can do to help your PCOS.
  • Order online today at theralogix.com. During checkout, use “PRC” code 127410 for an exclusive PCOS and Food Peace Podcast discount.
  • Enter to win a 90-day supply here! (We will be picking 4 random emails from those who enter during September 2018. All will be notified via email.)

(121) I’m ashamed that I can’t control my eating and drinking (with Victoria Welsby)

Have you experienced a chaotic relationship with food full of diets and shame? Do you struggle with an addiction to alcohol and wonder if abstinence looks the same with food and alcohol? Are you exploring intuitive eating concepts yet feel out of control? Listen to the latest Love Food podcast with special guest Victoria Welsby.

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This episode is brought to you by my online course, Your Step-by-Step Guide to PCOS and Food Peace™. You CAN make peace with food even with PCOS and I want to show you how.

Check out the Love, Food Podcast store. All T-Shirt designs have at least one with size range options from XS to 5X. All proceeds go to funding this labor of love to keep it as a free resource for you.

Product links may be affiliate. If you click and make a purchase, there’s no extra cost to you.

The transcribed episode can be found here.

Episode’s Key Points:

  • Special guest Victoria Welsby from BamPowLife.
  • Dieting and making strides to lose weight and change your body in an effort to get the things you want in life (or to just simply be accepted) is the rule in our society rather than the exception
  • Research shows that those who embark on a dieting journey regain a significant amount of the weight lost within the first year and all or most of the weight back at year five. So what does this mean? Diets don’t work.
  • Additionally, dieting frequently induces shame. Shame that isn’t yours to carry as you don’t fail at diets. Rather, the diets fail you and this shame burden belongs to our oppressive society.
  • Sometimes alcohol dependence coincides with one’s eating concerns. However, it is important to separate these as while you can be addicted to alcohol, you cannot be addicted to food. You need food to live whereas your survival isn’t dependent on alcohol. In addition, while you can have a “normal” physical and emotional relationship with food as you recover from disordered eating, you may not be able to have the same relationship with alcohol moving forward.
  • As you begin to heal, it is important to make space to honor how you’ve been coping and keeping yourself alive.
  • As you explore Intuitive Eating, it is common to feel like you are constantly battling your brain in the beginning. This is because your body has to learn to trust you again and know food is unconditionally accessible.
  • Be kind to yourself, be patient with yourself, and remove the shame as you begin your Intuitive Eating journey. It is challenging work and takes time.
  • Healing from internalized fat phobia is a huge part of this journey as well and means learning to feel at home in your body as it is now as there are no body size guarantees.
  • Fat bodies are “normal” bodies too. Connecting with those who live in fat bodies is an important step in healing your relationship with food and your body.

Show Notes:

Do you have a complicated relationship with food? I want to help! Send your Dear Food letter to LoveFoodPodcast@gmail.com. 

Click here to leave me a review in iTunes and subscribe. This type of kindness helps the show continue!

Thank you for listening to the Love, Food series.

Can food cure me? (Episode 120)

How many times have you read about someone curing their diabetes or PCOS with food? Feel frustrated you can’t too?? Listen to latest Love Food Podcast episode for ways to move forward while healing your relationship with food and your body.

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This episode is brought to you by my online course, Your Step-by-Step Guide to PCOS and Food Peace™. Enrollment is now open! You CAN make peace with food even with PCOS and I want to show you how.

Check out the whole Love, Food Podcast store here. All T-Shirt designs have at least one with size range options from XS to 5X. All proceeds go to funding this labor of love to keep it as a free resource for you.

Product links may be affiliate. If you click and make a purchase, there’s no extra cost to you.

The transcribed episode can be found here.

Episode’s Key Points:

  • Do you have a long history of dieting in your efforts to control or cure a medical condition or to just feel like you fit in within our society?
  • Many of the medical conditions we experience are blamed on ourselves. You are not to blame! Food is not to blame! These conditions are often genetically-based and incurable.
  • The “Shoulds” imposed on us by society lead to guilt, shame, and distrusting our innate wisdom that we all have for identifying our body’s needs
  • Diet seduction/”Should Eat Fantasy Compliance” is commonly experienced upon embarking on a new diet as we feel like we are moving towards meeting societal body standards. However, this distracts us from the destructive nature of dieting.
  • Research shows that diets do not work long-term and they predict weight gain and exacerbate many of the markers of medical conditions. So, why do diets continue to be sought out? Fat Phobia, White Supremacy, and Misogyny. We want to feel accepted, safe, and at home in our own skin. This is completely understandable. However, we don’t need to be fixed and our bodies don’t need to be fixed. Rather, society needs to be fixed.
  • Connecting with fat activists is an important step in dismantling the “Should Eat Fantasy Compliance” and fat phobia.

Show Notes:

Do you have a complicated relationship with food? I want to help! Send your Dear Food letter to LoveFoodPodcast@gmail.com. 

Click here to leave me a review in iTunes and subscribe. This type of kindness helps the show continue!

Thank you for listening to the Love, Food series.